133 – Start of the November 2011 Olive Harvest (part one)

Two of our friends, Kay and Elsie, who are regular visitors to Tre Cancelle, volunteered to come and help us with this year’s olive harvest.  Elsie also recruited two of her friends, Karen and Sylvia, who all belong to a popular Belly-Dancing group in South Wales.

Itri’s undulating hillsides are tinted with the silvery green foliage of olives trees, indeed Itri has been noted for the quality of its olives since Roman times.

The “Itrana” cultivar is exclusive to this specific area, thriving as a consequence of the unique environment, quality of the fertile soil, temperate micro –climate, sea breezes and fresh mountain air.

So for the last month the olive groves around Itri have been a hive of activity, with the cheery banter of workers laughing and jesting whilst preparing for the olive harvest, strimming grass and weeds and trimming and burning suckers.  Little “apes” (pronounced Ah-Pays, which translated literally mean “bees”) – small three wheeler vans noisily buzz and rattle along the local lanes, sometimes with a husband and generously proportioned wife cosily crammed inside the tiny driving cab.

By November many of the olives have grown round and plump and are gradually turning from bright green to dappled pink. Those harvested in November / December produce the much sought after “Early Harvest” Extra Virgin Olive Oil and / or Green Table Olives.

Other farmers prefer to harvested their olives when they are fully ripe, during February / March, to produce the “Mature Harvest Extra Virgin Oil and / or Purple / Black Table Olives.

After the well received comments from our last years November oil, we elected to harvest our olives early in the season, which whilst it produces less in volume, yields a wonderfully green and intense olive oil.

The weather seemed to be in our favour being set fair for most of the week.  The “Welsh Girls” were keen to get stuck in.

We started by carefully spreading out nets around some of the trees on the first terrace to be worked. Paul fired up the compressor to which can be fitted a variety of pneumatic tools, in this case a mechanical rake on a 4 meter telescopic pole, which is used to comb and vibrate the laden branches, causing the olives to cascade onto the nets below.

Sylvia

Elsie and Kay

 Some of the trees had grown very tall, and required pruning back, so Paul climbed up a ladder, and with his trusty chain saw, and lopped off the tops to a more manageable height of 4 meters,  thus allowing the olives to be easily harvested at ground level.

This is done by hand either by using small rakes or by gently running one’s fingers over the fronds, popping of the colourful fruits, a task I find enormously satisfying.

Elsie

Sylvia

Inevitably the odd stray olive manages to bounce off the net so we scrambled about under the trees collecting these up.

The nets were then carefully gathered up and the olives rolled to one edge, where stray twigs and leaves are pulled out before pouring the olives into the waiting plastic crates. The huge nets were then lugged to the next batch of trees to be harvested.

Elsie, Kay and Karen

Kay, Elsie, Sylvia and Karen

  Ideally the olives need to be processed within 48 hours of being harvested, to preserve the very best of their natural characteristics.

The minimum batch size to take to the olive mill is 200 kilos, or 2 quintale, to ensure that your olives are processed in a single lot, and that you retrieve your own oil at the end of the process, and that it is not a mixed with someone else’s olives.  We think this is very important because by choice we do not use pesticides and herbicides whereas some other producers are not so ecologically minded.

Therefore, in general we tend to work two days on and one day off.  Our team of volunteers worked well and following the first 2 day harvest we were able to take 209 kilos of olives to the mill.

The following day the “Welsh Girls” deserved a well earned day off. 

All photos by me © Louise Shapcott

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Tre Cancelle Farmhouse Apartments Near Sperlonga Beaches and Historic Itri, South Lazio, Italy

 

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One thought on “133 – Start of the November 2011 Olive Harvest (part one)

  1. I have to say, although hard work, it was a most enjoyable experience. We did have a fabulous time, lots of laughter. To see the mill, where the Olives are made into oil, was also something not to missed. Thank you, Paul and Louise, for your generous hospitality, as per usual. Love and Hugs xx Kay

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